Tag Archives: sleep

Help for Chronic Pain Patients

According to a recent news article by Rachel Noble Benner, a mental health counselor, chronic pain is defined as pain that lasts longer than three months. It affects more than 100 million sufferers in the United States alone, and for those who suffer from chronic pain caused by an illness or injury it may seem as if there is no end in sight to their misery.

Chronic pain is not merely one symptom or a limited experience like acute pain; it is usually accompanied by depression, fatigue, changes in appetite and trouble sleeping. It can hold sufferers back from wanting to socialize with family and friends, and it reduces their quality-of-life.

Chronic pain requires treatment by physicians using a holistic approach in order to relieve symptoms. Physical therapists should be able to reactivate injured muscles and retune a hyper-excited nervous system; exercise will help recover a patient’s nervous system by re-teaching nerves the difference between normal and harmful sensations, and counseling on a regular basis should help establish strengths, manage depression and anxiety, and develop relaxation techniques.

 

Original post in the Washington Post by Rachel Noble Benner

Reposted in News & Observer 1/20/15 http://bit.ly/1J3vquV

 

 

The Job: Insufficient Sleep Is A Compensable Condition


Today’s post comes to us from our colleague Jon Gelman of New Jersey.

The National Sleep Foundation recommends that U.S. adults receive, on average, 7–9 hours of sleep per night; however, 37.1% of adults report regularly sleeping <7 hours per night. Persons reporting sleeping <7 hours on average during a 24-hour interval are more likely to report unintentionally falling asleep during the day at least 1 day out of the preceding 30 days (46.2% compared with 33.2%) and nodding off or falling asleep at the wheel during the previous 30 days (7.3% compared with 3.0%). Frequent insufficient sleep (14 or more days in the past 30 days) also has been associated with self-reported anxiety, depressive symptoms, and frequent mental and physical distress (4).

Even short term sleep duration is linked with:

  • Increased risk of motor vehicle accidents
  • Increase in body mass index – a greater likelihood of obesity due to an increased appetite caused by sleep deprivation
  • Increased risk of diabetes and heart problems
  • Increased risk for psychiatric conditions including depression and substance abuse
  • Decreased ability to pay attention, react to signals or remember new information

Such findings suggest the need for greater awareness of the importance of sufficient sleep. Further information about factors relevant to optimal sleep can be obtained from the National Sleep Foundation (http://www.sleepfoundation.org) and CDC (http://www.cdc.gov/sleep).