Tag Archives: shooting

In Complicated Times, Police Who Risk Their Lives Still Need Support

Today’s post comes from guest author Edgar Romano, from Pasternack Tilker Ziegler Walsh Stanton & Romano.

Last week was a very bad one for police officers across the country, starting with the separate police shooting of two unarmed men. These shootings – days apart in different parts of the country – sparked widespread outrage and protests throughout the country. 

While the investigation continues into the circumstances surrounding these civilian shootings, video evidence suggests the outrage over these shootings appears to be justified. The week ended with the assassination of five police officers in Dallas who were providing protection to citizens engaged in a peaceful protest over the shootings of the unarmed men. The gunman indicated he had killed the police officers in retaliation for the shooting deaths. This was the worst loss of life for the police department since September 11, 2001.  Additionally, seven police officers were injured in the attack.

These horrific events highlight the difficult job that police face every day. While not all police officers are perfect (in fact, who amongst us is?), most don’t begin their shifts with the mindset that they are going to kill a civilian. Most see their role as keeping the peace and protecting citizens. They do, however, wonder many times whether they will make it through their shift safely and return home to their loved ones.    Unfortunately, they are not always immune to death and injury.   

As an attorney who has represented many law enforcement officers injured on the job, I know the majority of them receive medical treatment and may have a period of convalescence, but then are able to return to work. However, some sustain serious and career-ending injuries. Most police officers in New York City and Long Island are likely a member of a Civil Service Retirement System. If so, and they become permanently disabled from performing their specific job duties, they may be eligible for a life-long disability pension.

There are many pension systems in the state, all with different applications, rules, procedures, and guidelines. Each disability pension has its own statute of limitations and guidelines for eligibility. There are different pensions available, ranging from one-third to three-quarters. Just because you were injured on the job does not mean you are automatically entitled to the three-quarter pension, which would enable you to receive 75% of your previous year’s earnings. 

Although not always relevant, how police officers are injured on the job can impact whether they are entitled to a three-quarter disability pension. Additionally, just because they were injured while working does not automatically mean they are entitled to a three-quarter disability pension. Factors that get taken into account are issue of causation, medical evidence from the officer’s own doctor, and the retirement system’s medical board. It is not always an easy process for our law enforcement personnel to receive reasonable retirement benefits, but it should be. Day in and day out, they protect the citizens of our cities and our states, putting their own lives at risk simply because they are dressed in blue. 

There is a huge spotlight this week on police, and rightfully so, as there is so much mistrust and anger regarding the recent events. There needs to be an honest, open dialogue where those aggrieved are given the opportunity to be heard without fear of reprisal, just as the police department needs to be given the opportunity to have investigations completed before a rush to judgment. While the majority of police officers are honest and hardworking, those who fail to uphold their oath should be punished.

Police officers are sworn to protect and serve; they run toward trouble when we run away from it. They patrol neighborhoods that are dangerous, riddled with crime, where we are taught to avoid them. They put their lives on the line every day, knowing they might never return to their families. Yes, this has been a very tough week. Let’s hope that future discussions help bridge the gap between our police and the citizens they are sworn to protect.

 

Catherine M. Stanton is a senior partner in the law firm of Pasternack Tilker Ziegler Walsh Stanton & Romano, LLP. She focuses on the area of Workers’ Compensation, having helped thousands of injured workers navigate a highly complex system and obtain all the benefits to which they were entitled. Ms. Stanton has been honored as a New York Super Lawyer, is the past president of the New York Workers’ Compensation Bar Association, the immediate past president of the Workers’ Injury Law and Advocacy  Group, and is an officer in several organizations dedicated to injured workers and their families. She can be reached at 800.692.3717.

Workplace Violence and Sandy Hook Elementary School

In light of the horrific elementary school shootings in Newtown, Connecticut last week it may be time to re-evaluate workplace violence, which seems to be increasing at an alarming rate. Technically, workplace violence is any act where an employee is abused, threatened, intimidated, or assaulted in the workplace. It can include threats, harassment, and verbal abuse, as well as physical attacks by someone with an assault rifle. 

Two million American workers are victims of workplace violence every year. What’s worse is that workplace violence is one of the leading causes of job-related deaths in the United States. Last year, for example, one in every five fatal work injuries was attributed not to accidents but to workplace violence,  and  some employees are at an increased risk for harm. For example, employees who work with the public or who handle money are more at risk (i.e. bank tellers, pizza delivery drivers, or social workers). According to the 2011 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries by the U.S. Dept. of Labor, robbers were found to be the assailants in almost a third of homicide/workplace violence cases involving men, whereas female workers were more likely to be attacked by a relative (i.e. former spouse or partner) while at work.  

Preventing workplace violence is a challenging task and OSHA advises employers to create a Workplace Violence Prevention Program. Creating a safe perimeter for employees is crucial. Likewise, having an emergency protocol in place should reduce the number of fatalities in an attack, and that’s exactly what happened at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut when the school’s protocol saved the lives of many children.

Wacky Worker’s Comp Week. Stripper Denied Worker’s Comp Benefits

The South Carolina Supreme Court found that an exotic dancer was an “Independent Contractor,” not an employee.

Today’s post comes from guest author Tom Domer from The Domer Law Firm.

What a wacky week in the world of worker’s compensation.

We found that a stripper who was seriously injured by a bullet fired at the club where she was working was not entitled to worker’s compensation benefits because the South Carolina Supreme Court found she was not an employee, but rather a “Independent Contractor.” She had serious intestinal, liver, pancreas, kidney, and uterus injuries, and had her kidney removed – which rendered her unemployable as an exotic dancer. She claimed she was an employee because the club controlled her activities, including telling her when to dance, what music to dance to, and required her to strive to get VIP dances.

In Wisconsin, an employer’s inclination to mis-categorize an employee as an “Independent Contractor” can be tempting: avoidance of payment of worker’s or unemployment compensation premiums, payroll and Social Security taxes, and other employee benefits.

The Court of Appeals disagreed, indicating she decided the manner in which she performed her dances to satisfy the Boom Boom Room Club customers. In Wisconsin, an employer’s inclination to mis-categorize an employee as an “Independent Contractor” can be tempting: avoidance of payment of worker’s or unemployment compensation premiums, payroll and Social Security taxes, and other employee benefits. For many years the Courts and the Commission wrestled with the legal distinction between Independent Contractors and employees. Workers who maintained a separate business and held themselves out to render service to the public were Independent Contractors, if not employers themselves; all other workers were employees.

The legislature clarified the test for determining Independent Contractors status, indicating an Independent Contractor must maintain a separate business with his or her own office equipment, materials and other facilities, and hold or apply for a Federal Employer Identification Number. Seven other specific criteria apply. Any single criterion that rules out many Independent Contractors like the absence of a Federal I.D. Number or filing self-employment tax returns makes alleged “Independent Contractors” employees and covered under worker’s compensation in Wisconsin. Many employers including trucking companies, temporary help agencies, and up to and including exotic dancers are asked to sign Independent Contractor contracts when in fact they really are employees under worker’s compensation.