Tag Archives: construction

Number of Workplace Fatalities Higher In 2014

According to a recent article published by the U.S. Department of Labor, workplace fatalities have increased from 4,585 in 2013 to 4,679 in 2014. This is the highest number of workplace fatalities since 2008 when 5,214 deaths were reported to the Department of Labor.

The most shocking rise in workplace deaths occurred in the oil-and-gas industry. There were 142 workers that died in the oil fields in 2014 which was 27% higher than the 112 workers that died in the fields in 2013. Other industries that saw a sharp incline in the number of employee deaths include construction, agriculture, manufacturing and mining. Female employee deaths also rose 13% from the previous year, mostly due to road accidents and homicides.

U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez issued the following statement: “Far too many people are still killed on the job — 13 workers every day taken from their families tragically and unnecessarily. These numbers underscore the urgent need for employers to provide a safe workplace for their employees as the law requires.”

 

Read more here: 

The Wall Street Journal: U.S. Workplace Fatalities Likely at Highest Level Since 2008

www.workerscompensation.com:Statement from Secretary of Labor on Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2014

 

Number of N.C. Work-Related Deaths Nearly Doubled in 2014

The number of workers killed last year on the job in North Carolina has nearly doubled according to the state Department of Labor. A total of 44 people were killed in work-related accidents, all but one of the workers was classified as male, and all of the deceased workers were classified as “laborers” by the Labor Department. In 2013, there were only 23 deaths.

Labor Commissioner Cherie Berry analyzed the deaths and found that many accidents occurred between 60 and 90 days on the job, and a few workers were killed on the first day of their employment. This is largely related to lack of proper safety training before starting construction jobs.

In order to combat this increasing statistic, Builders Mutual Insurance Company worked with Commissioner Berry to create public service announcements about common hazards on construction sites. These ads are aired on Univision, and will be aired through March of this year.

Original Article found here:  http://www.newsobserver.com/2015/01/22/4496586_number-of-nc-workers-killed-on.html#storylink=misearch

Misclassification: Cheating the System in North Carolina

A yearlong McClatchy public-records investigation of government construction projects spanning 28 states discovered widespread misclassification of construction workers as independent contractors instead of employees (News & Observer, September 8, 2014). By misclassifying their employees, construction companies were able to undercut their law-abiding competitors while at the same time exploiting those desperate for work. As a result, the study found that North Carolina loses approximately $467 million per year in tax revenue from construction firms and their employees.

Such a scam is simple. Companies declare that hourly wage earners working for them are independent subcontractors, not employees. These companies do not withhold income tax or file payroll taxes on those workers. They also do not pay unemployment tax and are not required to provide workers’ compensation insurance. Thus, there is less paperwork and more profit for the companies. The McClatchy investigation estimated that these companies can save 20% in labor costs by treating employees as independent contractors.

Misclassification has far-reaching effects. The investigation discovered that these cheaters:

(1)    ignored existing labor laws and the IRS by misclassifying employees;

(2)    undercut the bids of law-abiding companies;

(3)    cheated workers by eliminating unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation coverage  and social security payments;

(4)    benefited from lax government officials who could have stopped them.